Crucify Him!

Mark 15

Saturday, August 6, 2022

Chapter 15 of Mark reaches the climax of the story of Jesus, but of course not the end. It’s the pivotal part where the prophecies he had been teaching of his death and sacrifice for our sins will come to fruition. No doubt, you’ve heard this story a thousand times, and for good reason. This event, the sacrifice of the lamb, is the only reason we are allowed to undeservingly reach salvation. What’s more impressive is that this story, just like virtually every other parable and sermon Jesus gave, can be interpreted to apply multiple lessons to our lives.

For instance, when bombarded by accusations and insults from the chief priests, Jesus stood firm in his teaching of remaining non-confrontational. “But Jesus still made no reply, and Pilate was amazed.” Mark 15:5. Jesus is able to remain non-confrontational when all he had to do was respond with a single truthful testimony. He refrained, knowing that all of humanity needed his sacrifice, as God willed it. Could you remain truthful and non-violent when the worst of life is hurled at you? How about when what’s being said is so obviously false, yet they won’t back down?

“’What shall I do, then, with the one you call the king of the Jews?’ Pilate asked them. ‘Crucify him!’ they shouted. ‘Why? What crime has he committed?’ asked Pilate. But they shouted all the louder, ‘Crucify him!’” Mark 15:12-14. Here, the people are accusing Jesus only on the basis of rage. There is no reasoning behind their decision, only malice. They refuse to listen to any voice of reason, as they are blinded by their own lust for destruction. Don’t be deceived by the masses and be sure to think critically for yourself. Never take someone else’s words as absolute truth without a grain of salt.

Nowadays, especially with the internet, people are more connected than they have ever been in all of human history. We see news quicker, respond quicker, think less, and react according to what we think other people would want. Whose opinion is the only one that ultimately matters? God’s, of course. Just like the members of the court who accused Jesus in an effort to please themselves, we lose sight of the only thing that matters. What’s worse is that we mock Jesus in our stupor as well; just like the court of those who crucified Jesus.

“They put a purple robe on him, then twisted together a crown of thorns and set it on him. And they began to call out to him, ‘Hail, king of the Jews!’” Mark 15:17-18. They mock him for they do not know who they mock. Do you mock Jesus with your words or actions?

Mark 15:31-32 says, “In the same way the chief priests and the teachers of the law mocked him among themselves. ‘He saved others,’ they said, ‘but he can’t save himself! Let this Christ, this King of Israel, come down now from the cross, that we may see and believe.’ Those crucified with him also heaped insults on him.” They mock the power of Christ because they do not believe what they cannot see. Even other people condemned to die with him are heaving insults at him because they cannot see beyond themselves or their own understanding. And look what it did—it sent our only hope of salvation into the most miserable state a person can physically endure.

“And at the ninth hour Jesus cried out in a loud voice, ‘Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani?’—which means ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’” Mark 15:34. They sent Jesus into this state, and it is by their actions that they will be condemned. Jesus was blameless and had every right to scream from the depths of his soul at the nature of his torture. Do you ever feel that God has forsaken you? Sometimes it seems like He has left us because we don’t see His guiding hand. Be thankful for the things that you have and do not need and be thankful for the things you do not have but do rightfully deserve as a result of your sins.

Mark 15:39 says, “And when the centurion, who stood there in front of Jesus, heard his cry and saw how he died, he said, ‘Surely this man was the son of God!’” Only after seeing it can they believe, because although they see, they do not look. Remember not to be led in your thinking by the masses, for they do not know the manner of which the things they speak. Take heart in your suffering, for the true prize still awaits.

-Mason Kiel

Application Questions

  1. How are you at staying truthful and non-confrontational when you are wrongly attacked?
  2. What does Jesus’ sacrifice mean to you?
  3. How do we remain thankful in our darkest hour?

The Veil Torn

Mark 15

            God never does anything by accident, and what we read in Mark 15 is no exception. To me, one of the most incredible events surrounding the crucifixion of Jesus is the temple veil being torn. This is what Mark 15:37-39 says about the event, “And Jesus uttered a loud cry, and breathed His last. And the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. When the centurion, who was standing right in front of Him, saw the way He breathed His last, he said, ‘Truly this man was the Son of God!’”

            There is a great significance in the veil being torn. To understand how important this is, we first need to understand the temple layout. Moving from outside the temple in, the first thing upon entering is the outer court. This is where the altar was kept for offering sacrifices. After walking into the temple, is the holy place. This is where the showbread, incense altar and lamp stands would be. Only priests were allowed in this part of the temple. The next and most precious part of the temple is called the holy of holies. This was the innermost part of the temple and it was cut off from the rest of the temple by a giant veil. The veil would have been thirty feet long and thirty feet high. Talk about a big piece of cloth. The holy of holies was cut off from the rest of the temple because it was the place God dwelled. Only the high priest, once a year, was allowed to go into the holy of holies. This veil was the literal barrier keeping God separate from the tainted and sinful world. So when Jesus dies, why is this veil torn?

            The simple answer is this, when Jesus died he removed the barrier between God and man. God no longer needed to be separate from His people because Jesus covered that sin and washed it away. This means that those who put their faith in Jesus could now have access to the father like never before seen in history.  Look at what 1 Timothy 2:5 has to say, “For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus”. We no longer have to bring sacrifices to the temple because Jesus was the ultimate sacrifice that paid for sin once and for all. We no longer need a high priest to enter the holy of holies for us because Jesus is now our high priest serving as a mediator between us and God. Thereby, giving us full access to the father. We no longer have to gaze from outside the temple wondering what it is like to be in the presence of God because now, through the death and resurrection of Jesus, we are being made into a spiritual temple where God resides in us. The church, which is us, is now where God dwells. Do you see now the significance of the veil being torn? It is a representation of one the biggest shifts in history. The veil being torn is a mile marker of a new age, the church age, where God is no longer is hidden in the holy of holies, but has poured His Spirit out upon the church.

            We now have the great pleasure of living a life of freedom and access because of what Jesus did that day. When the veil was torn, everything changed. The next time you’re in trouble, hurting or wanting to rejoice, remember that you have access to the Father. There is no veil separating you from God.

-Josiah Cain

Links to today’s Bible reading – Exodus 35-36 and Mark 15

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