Sending the Son

Mark 12

Wednesday, August 3, 2022

Jesus, over and over again in Mark chapter 12, both evades the entrapment of those who wish him harm and enlightens his followers concurrently. In this chapter, men of simultaneous hypocrisy and high standing as well as the Sadducees attempted to either ask Jesus a question to bait him into testifying against the law of Moses or deny his Christhood. He first tells a story of a vineyard and its owner, then corrects hypocrites in their mentality on taxes, and catches the Sadducees in their deliberately poor interpretation of the word.

               I highly suggest that, before reading further, you go read Chapter 12:1-12 for yourself because it caught me off guard! But anyway, the chapter begins with Jesus laying out a parable of a man who purchased a vineyard and put effort into making it a fruitful investment. He put a wall around it, bought a winepress, and even built a watchtower for its protection. Having invested this much of himself into it, he went on a rightful journey as he rented it out to some tenants. However, in their stupor, the tenants got greedy and refused to pay the vineyard owner what was due. The owner sent man after man to collect the money, all of which were returned either beaten or dead (not good). After the man had sent all his servants to collect the money, he was left with only his son. He hoped that, since it was his only son whom he loved dearly, they would finally respect him. But rather, they saw this as an opportunity to take the owner’s inheritance for themselves, and they killed the son too! Jesus then says, “What then will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come and kill those tenants and give the vineyard to others. Haven’t you read this scripture: ‘The stone the builders rejected has become the capstone; the Lord has done this, and it is marvelous in our eyes.’”

The chief priests, teachers, and elders who had questioned Jesus’ authority wanted so badly to persecute Jesus for telling this story, because it was clear that Jesus was talking about them. You see, the owner of the vineyard represents God, who built a beautiful place for the tenants, us humans, to live. He put effort into creating this world, and when He sent his only and beloved son to talk to us, man killed the son of God. But it does not end there. The scripture that he quoted stands as a retribution for the murder of Jesus. ‘The stone the builders rejected has become the capstone, the Lord has done this, and it is marvelous in our eyes.’ For those who don’t know, the capstone is the stone to surmount all other stones in a wall or pillar. That is, God took the stone that man rejected and elevated him to a position above the rest, and it is marvelous.

This also acts as a warning to us. Although that part is not as fun to think about, to ignore it would be doing injustice to the passage as a whole. The owner of the vineyard is to come and kill the tenants, because they killed his son. God has every right to put those who desecrate His son in their place. When Jesus comes to you with an answer or a question, do you push him away or do you welcome him?

In this passage, the son coming to the tenants is a final gift from the owner of the vineyard, that he may still have mercy on them after all that they had done. And yet, they squander this gift by killing him. Are you squandering the gift that God so graciously gave you; this life on earth blessed by salvation through the blood of Christ? We must not be overcome with greed and selfishness of the pleasures of this world that are only here because God put them here in the first place. If gratitude can be seen as a parent of all virtues, (by this meaning that we can’t truly express any other virtue without first being gracious for the current state in which we preside), then we need to be gracious for what God gave us. We are blessed to have this time on earth that we may spread the word and increase the Kingdom of God, as is our mission.

-Mason Kiel

Application Questions

  1. What do we learn about Jesus from this parable?
  2. Do you accept that God has sent His beloved Son for you? How do you receive him?
  3. What does it mean to you that, “The stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone (or capstone); the Lord has done this, and it is marvelous in our eyes”? (Mark 12:10&11 – quoted from Psalm 118). Do you give Jesus the place of capstone/cornerstone in your life now? What does/would that look like?

What Shall I Do? I Will Send My Son.

Luke 20

Luke 20 13

Merry Christmas!

May your day be full of sweet reminders of God’s love.  And may you pass along that love to others.

It is easy to lose sight of the whole picture of Jesus when we gather to feast and exchange presents amid the tinsel, lights, tree, and nativity scene.  A pregnant virgin, a faithful fiancé, a holy night, an angel assembly, a crew of shepherds, traveling wise men, pass the ham, and unwrap the presents.  But wait . . . why??? And then what????

It appears Jesus didn’t spend time preaching about his miraculous and incredibly true birth.  In fact, only two of the four gospels record bits and pieces of his birth story.  But here in Luke 20 Jesus taught the Parable of the Tenants.  And while it isn’t likely used in very many Christmas sermons or devotions, it actually paints a very fitting picture of why Jesus was sent – and what was “the rest of the story” – beyond the shepherds and wise men.

In this parable God plays the role of the vineyard owner.  He entrusts his vineyard (earth) to mankind as farm tenants to care for his vineyard.  The owner sends back several servants (Old Testament prophets) to the vineyard to retrieve some fruit for the owner.  Instead the selfish, greedy tenants mistreat the servants and send them back with nothing for the master.   

“Then the owner of the vineyard said, ‘What shall I do? I will send my son, whom I love; perhaps they will respect him.’ (Luke 20:13).  And so, the Son of God is given a mission for his Father: go to the vineyard to represent his Father to attain what belongs to his Father – the fruit of the vineyard.  God could have done this in so many ways.  He could have sent a violent and powerful son to use force to swiftly get the Father’s work done and repay the tenants for their selfish, greedy wickedness.  But instead the Son was given – a baby – as the Son of Man and Son of God.  And the angels rejoiced.   And the shepherds were in awe as they found things just as they had been told and then joyfully shared the news.

And the Son of God “grew in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man” – the tenants of the vineyard. (Luke 2:52).   And the son of the vineyard owner teaches and preaches and performs miracles to display and prove the goodness and sovereignty and master plan of the vineyard owner.  But, they still don’t get it.  Forsaking the master’s plan, as well as his very son, they conspire together and the tenants kill the son.  Now, they figure, the vineyard will be theirs.  There is no longer an heir.  And so, the tenants triumph for a time and seem to have free reign of the vineyard.

But, that is not the end of the story.   In his parable Jesus now switches from past tense to future tense as he says, “What then will the owner of the vineyard do to them?  He will come and kill those tenants and give the vineyard to others.”  So, too, there is a future in our Christmas story today.  And, there is a price that will be paid for all tenants who have chosen to forsake the son.  

In your celebrating today, and in your work tomorrow, in your heart and mind and actions, in your time, in your giving, in your whole living – do not forsake the son.

-Marcia Railton

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