How can we feed 5 thousand with so little?

Mark 6

Thursday, July 28, 2022

Everyone knows the story of Jesus feeding the five thousand. It is one of the classic stories that we first learn in bible school! While it is a very simple story, there is hidden meaning in the words. Yes, it is a story of how incredible Jesus was, and it showed how faithful people were to him, but what else does it mean?

Mark 6:34, is where Jesus first notices the people gathered on the shore. He says they were like, “Sheep without a shepherd”, and he has compassion for them. He sees people who are lost and makes sure to go and guide them towards life and hope.

But the thing I want to focus on is when he talks with the disciples and feeds the people.

Mark 6:35-44.

Once it was late, the disciples went to Jesus and told him that he should send the people away so they could eat. Jesus responded and told the disciples to feed the crowd of people. I can only imagine the looks on their faces! They responded, asking Jesus if they should go buy 200 denarii worth of bread. Finally, Jesus tells them to go and see how many loaves of bread are in the crowd – five loaves and two fish.

            Now imagine being a disciple at this point. They have seen Jesus do miracles, but this must seem nuts! They have nothing close to being enough to feed these people, but they knew he would somehow do it. This is what God wants us to be like with our faith. We may feel like we are standing in front of a mountain, but God wants us to trust him and know that with his strength, we can do anything. Whether that’s feeding five thousand or climbing a mountain.

Jesus then looks to the heavens while breaking the loaves and dividing the fish, and there was enough to feed and satisfy everyone, and there was extra.

This story touches my heart because it describes how we can do so much with only a little. We do not start with everything we think we need, but God provides abundantly more than we could ever imagine as we work to reach his people. No matter what our purpose is, God provides everything we need, we just must have faith and be patient, knowing that whatever we are called to, God will provide.

-Hannah Eldred

Application Questions

  1. When have you felt there was no way you would have enough (resources, finances, companionship, wisdom, or faith)? How did it work out for you? In what ways do lean times help grow your faith?
  2. In what ways has God shown Himself to be faithful in your own life, in His word, and in the lives of others?

The Size of Her Miracle

2 Kings 4

March 16

In Steve Mattison’s devotion this past Sunday on 1 Kings 17 he pointed out the difference between God providing for the needs of those who love and serve Him compared to God providing an easy life to those who love and serve Him. One can be counted on, but not the other. We can always count on God to provide what we need, but that is not the same as never being in need. In fact, it is during the more difficult times in our lives that we have the opportunity to put all our faith – and our deeds – into His hands to see how He will provide once again. Those difficult times are faith building opportunities.

2 Kings 4 includes two women with impressive stories of how God provided for them in their time of need through the prophet Elisha.

The first account is of a God-fearing widow with two sons and demanding bill-collectors. She has already lost her husband but now if she can’t pay her debts the bill collectors will take her sons to pay off her debts. Her life has been far from easy. But I love how God would show Himself faithful – working with her and her generous community. God could have just supplied all the coins she needed in the mouth of a fish or something – guess He was saving that “trick” for later. When God provides, it doesn’t mean we just sit and watch, often there is a job for us to do to get things rolling. Sometimes it might mean going out to catch the fish with the coin in its mouth (Matthew 17:24-27). For the widow, Elisha asked her what she DID have. God can use the little bit we are thankful for and recognize we DO have to then multiply our blessings.

In this case, the widow was also to ask her neighbors for help – she needed their empty jars. Her community had the opportunity to play a part in supporting her. They weren’t going to be the ones paying the debt for her, but they were providing part of what she needed in order for her to faithfully fulfill her role so God could pour out the blessings like only He can do. Elisha told her, “Don’t ask for just a few (jars).” (2 Kings 4:3). If she would have had a bad attitude and said, “This is stupid, I don’t want to ask my neighbors for jars, I don’t like relying on others, how is this going to help? I will just get a handful of jars” then she would have just experienced a tiny miracle and she wouldn’t have had enough to pay off the full debt. God doesn’t need to bless the bad attitudes. Watch your attitude. When the man of God says, “Don’t ask for just a few”, then go out and ask for a lot! The size of her miracle was going to depend on how faithful she was, and how big her view of God was. If she thought God could only help a little, only a few jars would be collected and only that much oil would have poured from her little jar of oil. Thankfully, it appears she collected quite a few, so that so much oil poured from her little jar she would be able to not only sell the new full jars to pay off the debt but then also live off of the rest. God supplied even more than what she needed at that time – because she was faithful to do her part and had a big view of what God could do – and so she listened to and obeyed the man of God.

The second woman in 2 Kings 4 is a well-off woman with a husband but no sons. She recognizes Elisha as a man of God and practices hospitality (first inviting him several times for supper, and then even creating an addition on their house – a small room on their roof – so he could stay overnight.) Their town of Shunem was about half-way between Elisha’s hometown and Mount Carmel, which Elisha still visited regularly, so Elisha would come and go – and was always well provided for when he was with them. So, Elisha promises her a son, a miracle from God as her husband is old and she had resigned herself to a life without children.

The baby is indeed born, but a few years later he dies in her arms, struck with some sudden severe ailment. She carries her dead son to Elisha’s room and lays him on the bed, and then tells her husband in the field that she will need a servant and donkey as she is going to travel to find Elisha. A commentary suggested she didn’t tell her husband of the death of their son for fear that he would have him buried right away as it was hot harvest season. Instead, her faith spurs her on to action. She needs to speak to the man of God. It’s a great story that I can’t tell as well as the writer of 2 Kings – so make sure you read it to see how the story ends…

God provides. He doesn’t just hand out the easy life. Be prepared for difficulties. They don’t mean God is not there, or He doesn’t care. Even in the trials, God provides. He calls you (sometimes through the men and women of God) to step out in faith – still believing even when you are in pain. When you feel at a loss, keep your big view of God and all He can do. God provides.

Questions for Reflection and Discussion

  1. How have you seen God provide for you? What might He have asked of you in order to receive the blessings He wanted to give to you? How did others play a part?
  2. How can you help those in your community who are in the midst of difficult times?
  3. How would you rate your hospitality? What blessings have you (or might you) receive from welcoming others? How can you show hospitality this month?
  4. Why did God allow the death of the Shunammite’s son? Look ahead to 2 Kings 8:1-6 for even more insight. How does God provide even when the dead are not raised – right away?

Elijah – the Lord Jehovah is my God

1 Kings 17

March 13

1 Kings 17 has so much in it, it’s almost impossible to cover it all in one devotion.  It starts with Elijah standing before King Ahab and declaring that there wouldn’t be rain for the next few years, except at Elijah’s command.  We need a little context for this.  King Ahab’s wife was Jezebel, a foreigner, who worshiped Baal.  Baal was the Phoenician fertility god that supposedly sent rain.  Jezebel was actively trying to cause Israel to worship Baal, and was trying to eliminate the worship of Jehovah, the one true God.

God had made promises to Moses long before in Deuteronomy 11:13-14, “If you faithfully obey the commands I am giving you today – to love the Lord your God and to serve him with all your heart and with all your soul – then I will send rain on your land in its season, both autumn and spring rains, so that you may gather in your grain, new wine, and oil.”  In Deuteronomy 28, we find the curses for turning away from God.  In verses 23-24, we find, “the sky over your head will be bronze, the ground beneath you iron.  The Lord will turn the rain of your country into dust and powder; it will come down from the skies until you are destroyed.”

Remember that God always keeps his word, whether it is the promise of blessing for obedience, or of cursing for disobedience.  And in Israel, at that time, the country had already been worshiping the two calf idols that Jeroboam had made many generations before.  Now, the Israelites were increasing their rebellion by completely turning away from God, so God sent Elijah to Ahab to punish the country, and to set up a showdown three and a half years later to prove once and for all who was the real God.

Once Elijah had delivered his message, God sent him to a ravine, where ravens brought him food twice a day, and he drank from a brook – until it dried up.

Then, God sent Elijah to a poor widow in a foreign country.  Elijah asked her for some water and food.  The widow told him (1 Kings 17:12), “I don’t have any bread – only a handful of flour in a jar and a little oil in a jug.  I’m gathering a few sticks to take home and make a meal for myself and my son, so that we may eat it – and die.”

Elijah told her that if she baked that bread for him, after that, she could bake some for herself and for her son – because God would cause the flour and oil not to run out until the famine was over.  If you were that widow, would you have given your last meal to a stranger?  She did, and as a result of her faith and God’s blessing, her flour and oil did not run out – just like Elijah had said.

Eventually, the widow’s son got sick and died.  Elijah prayed, “O Lord my God, let this boy’s life return to him!”  And in verse 22, we read, “The Lord heard Elijah’s cry, and the boy’s life returned to him, and he lived.”  Incredible!

I see several applications in this chapter to us today.  

Elijah was a godly man.  His name meant “the Lord (Jehovah) is my God”, and his name fits.  And this was at a time when virtually everyone else had forsaken God.  It’s only because Elijah was a godly man that his prayers were so powerfully answered, and that God protected him.  We too need to be godly if we want good things from God.

Elijah went where God told him to go, and when God told him to go there.  Presumably, God sent Elijah to Ahab.  We know that God sent him to the Kerith Ravine – and because of his obedience, God provided for him.  Then, after the brook dried up, Elijah didn’t go anywhere until God told him to go to Zarephath and meet up with the widow God had arranged.  Again Elijah obeyed, and God provided.  We need to be willing to do what God says, when he says it, if we expect God to provide for us.

Elijah experienced hardship, even though he was obviously doing God’s will.  He certainly didn’t have a life of ease, but God did provide for his needs.  We can expect the same.

Elijah could pray!  He prayed that there would be a drought, and it happened.  He prayed that the boy would be resurrected, and he was.  We’re told in James 5:17-18, “Elijah was a man just like us.  He prayed earnestly that it would not rain, and it did not rain on the land for three and a half years.  Again he prayed, and the heavens gave rain, and the earth produced its crops.”  Yes, these were incredible miracles, but God did the miracles, not Elijah.  Elijah was a person just like us, but he was close to God, and God answered his prayers.  If we want our prayers to be answered, we too need to be close to God.

Everything Elijah was able to do was because of his obedience to God.  How do you compare?  

-Steve Mattison

Questions for Reflection and Discussion

  1. God has a way of creatively providing for those who obey Him. How did God provide for Elijah’s needs? How have you experienced God’s providence?
  2. What was the widow asked to do to help provide for the man of God? Why do you think she did it? How can God use you to help provide for His faithful people in hard times? What are you willing to sacrifice to be used by God in this way? What do you think would have happened to her if she had declined helping and fed herself and her son first? What would have happened to Elijah?
  3. What do you think of Elijah’s prayer life? What do you think of yours? What do you think contributed to Elijah’s prayer life? If you want to see your prayer life deepen and expand, what steps should you take? How serious are you about it?

Celebrate and Remember

Deuteronomy 16

February 21

Chapter 16 begins with the reminder to celebrate the Passover. It was a time that was set aside to remember how their God saved them from Egyptian slavery. More specifically from the angel of death that passed over those Jewish people who placed the blood of a lamb on their door posts.

We also see the reminder of the Festival of Weeks (celebrating the harvest/first fruits) and the Festival of Tabernacles (remembering the years of wandering). Each were given specifications as to how and when to celebrate. 

Each of these celebrations was to be a reminder of where they came from and to celebrate God’s provision. God provided a way out, he provided the harvest and he provided for the Jewish people in their 40 year wilderness wandering. 

Knowing that God will provide in all life circumstances should give us joy and help encourage us in difficult times. God has been there before and he will be there again. He provides, always!

We all should set up reminders to celebrate the way God has worked in our lives. The reminders can help us remain thankful and never take for granted what God has done, is doing or what he will do in the future. 

-John Wincapaw

Questions for Reflection and Discussion

  1. Make a list of how God has provided for you. How will you express your thankfulness to the Lord? What reminders do you already have in place, and what reminders can you add to your home, your routine, and your calendar to ensure that you remember and thank God for the way He has provided?
  2. What is the danger in not being intentional in remembering what God has done and provided?
  3. What is your favorite holiday? Why? How do you celebrate it? What might God want you to remember as you celebrate? How could you do that better?
  4. Each of the three festivals decreed in Deuteronomy 16 included bringing a sacrifice, gift or offering to the Lord. “No one should appear before the Lord empty-handed: Each of you must bring a gift in proportion to the way the Lord your God has blessed you.” (verses 16b & 17) What can you give to the Lord so you do not come before Him empty-handed?

The LORD Will Provide

Genesis 22

February 3

There are many different times that different people in the Bible confess their true faith. At the beginning of Genesis 22, God tells Abraham to sacrifice his only son. We see Abrahams’s true faith when he doesn’t protest or complain. He just does what God told him to do. I for one am very jealous of his faith. 

As Abraham was stretching out his arm to slay his son, an angel of the Lord called to him from heaven telling him to stop. Then, they heard a rustle from behind them and it was a ram. This shows us that God is with us and He will always provide a way. We just have to have faith like Abraham. I hope that we can all grow our faith in the near future and fully trust in Him.

-Nik Ransom (youth who attended reFUEL: North last month, and son of one of our writers two weeks ago)

Questions for Reflection and Discussion

  1. Take a moment and think about what you love most in life. Would you be willing to give whatever it is if God told you to? Would you give it up with or without hesitation?
  2. Abraham is known as a man of great faith. Why? What does James have to say about Abraham in the New Testament? (James 2:14-26) Is it possible to have great faith without action/deeds/obedience? How can we practice growing our faith?
  3. Re-read the account of Abraham willing to sacrifice his son Isaac while knowing what you know of God’s sacrifice of His son Jesus. What similarities do you find? What differences? What does this say of God’s sacrifice and love for you?

Tomorrow we will be reading Genesis 27.

Self-improvement Help Needed

But Not From Yourself

Romans 7

I think everyone can empathize with Paul when he states, “I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do.” (Romans 7:15)

Even in every day routines there may be areas we want to improve or change. Just look at the huge amount of self-improvement and renewal books that are printed each year. Maybe we want to: lose weight, get fit, stop bad habits, eat healthier, get out of debt and save money, spend more time with family, be less stressed or read through the Bible. Ok, hopefully this one is happening.

So wanting to overcome sin and do good is a great goal, but maybe you feel as Paul did, “For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out.” On our own, we cannot overcome sin, but as Christians we are not on our own. Thank the LORD, He is with us and He has provided what we need to overcome sin. In verse 25 we see that Paul is relying on God’s provision in Christ. “Thanks be to God, who delivers me through Jesus Christ our Lord!”

We are no longer condemned because we are in Christ Jesus, but sin is condemned. Through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit who gives life has set you free from the law of sin and death. We no longer live by our sinful nature, but according to the Spirit. And as we will discover in Romans chapter 8, we are more than conquerors through him who loved us and nothing in all creation, is able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord. We truly need to realize the love that God has for us and rely on His Spirit working in us. 

-Rebecca Dauksas

Today’s Bible reading passage can be read or listened to at BibleGateway here – 2 Chronicles 15-16 and Romans 7

God Sends Answers

1 Chronicles 25-26

Reading through Chronicles it is easy to skim past large sections that seem to drone on for hours. But the fact that the whole book of Chronicles was true history of the Israelites, that was written down for us to read thousands of years later is truly fascinating. The book of Chronicles which starts off with the genealogy from Adam, shows how much the Israelites appreciated and treasured their heritage and lineage. They viewed their history as all the ways God provided for them over the years. 

Chapters 23-26 are devoted to the organization of the temple. It tells in detail the families who served in the temple and how God chose the people to be servants of the temple by being musicians, gatekeepers, treasurers, and temple officials. These positions were cast by lot. The high priest who wore the special ephod was able to cast lots using the urim and thummim. This was one way God communicated with his people. It allowed God to give the Israelites a direct yes (urim) or no (thummim) answer. 

There are many times in the Bible where it tells us that something was determined by lot. For example, Saul was appointed King of Israel by lot, and the lot was cast on Jonathan when he ate the honey he wasn’t supposed to eat according to Saul’s orders (1 Samuel 14:42), and Matthias was chosen as the apostle to replace Judas by lot (Acts 1:26), and to make decisions on how to divide the land to each of the 12 tribes (Joshua 18:6). The Bible records many other times when the people used lots to seek God’s counsel. 

So what can we take away from all of this? God loves his people, He wants to show us His plans for our lives. Part of God’s character is that he is immutable- never changing through the ages. In most cultures today, casting lots is often overlooked as a means of receiving communication and answers from God, but we must not overlook His word given to us – including Chronicles- which show God’s continuity and love to His people. God knows that we are a forgetful people who don’t remember all the many things God has done over the years. Through Chronicles we see a God who kept his promises to the Israelites and who organized the temple and determined its leaders by lot. This same God is involved in our lives as well. It’s filled with the history of God providing for and keeping true with his promises to his people. It was used to remind the Israelites of these things and it can remind us as well how God was working through their lives and how He is and was and will work in ours. And knowing this helps us Stand Firm for Him.

-Makayla Railton

Today’s Bible reading passages can be read or listened to at BibleGateway here – 1 Corinthians 25-26 and Proverbs 29

When You’re Ready to Give Up

1 Kings 19-20

Have you ever been hiking on a strenuous trail or baled hay on a hot summer day? These tasks can prove quite difficult as your muscles become strained, you become overheated, and your endurance slowly dwindles. The idea of stopping and taking a nap or just quitting all together sounds very tempting. It seems like the best thing to do, but you have to keep going.

I remember one day when I was unloading a wagon full of hay bales on a hot and humid summer day. There were about 60 hay bales to unload and stack in the barn. About halfway through, I started to get tired. I was hot from the bright sun. I was itchy because of the hay that covered me, and I had rope burns from the twine on the bales. I was ready to be done, but I couldn’t stop. Rain was coming in that evening and I had to get the hay under cover before that happened. So, I kept going until my task was finished.

In 1 Kings 19, we find Elijah at a point where he is ready to give up. He is on the run again. Jezebel wants him dead, so he flees from her grasp. But he is tired of running and having to look over his shoulder. He felt like he could not continue in this way any longer. Those before him had been put to rest and he says he is no better than them. Therefore, he asks God to let him die.

Rather than letting him die, though, God sent him sustenance through an angel. Bread and water were offered to Elijah that he might have the strength to continue. So, he went to sleep again and then the angel appeared once more providing more food. This food gave him the strength he needed. For without it, he could not have made the journey. It was not yet Elijah’s time. There was work that he still needed to do, and God gave him the strength to do so.

Sometimes it can be hard to carry on with our tasks, but God is there to strengthen us. Like a cool glass of water at the end of a hike or when baling hay, God is there to sustain us. God was there to strengthen Elijah and we too can be strengthened through God.

-Hannah Deane

Today’s Bible reading passages can be read or listened to at BibleGateway here – 1 Kings 19-20 and Proverbs 3

Passing the First Tests

So after the amazing events of Exodus 14 and the crossing of the Red Sea on dry ground and the waters swallowing up the armies of Pharaoh the Israelites spend some time praising God  and we have the text of their praises in the beginning of Chapter 15, and then they set out on the road.

Exodus 15

22 Then Moses led the people of Israel away from the Red Sea, and they moved out into the desert of Shur. They traveled in this desert for three days without finding any water. 23 When they came to the oasis of Marah, the water was too bitter to drink. So they called the place Marah (which means “bitter”).

24 Then the people complained and turned against Moses. “What are we going to drink?” they demanded. 25 So Moses cried out to the Lord for help, and the Lord showed him a piece of wood. Moses threw it into the water, and this made the water good to drink.”

It was there at Marah that the Lord set before them the following decree as a standard to test their faithfulness to him. 26 He said, “If you will listen carefully to the voice of the Lord your God and do what is right in his sight, obeying his commands and keeping all his decrees, then I will not make you suffer any of the diseases I sent on the Egyptians; for I am the Lord who heals you.”

27 After leaving Marah, the Israelites traveled on to the oasis of Elim, where they found twelve springs and seventy palm trees. They camped there beside the water.

Right after God showed them that he is capable of providing everything for them he gives them a test and they instantly fail the test.  God is showing them that they have bitter hearts and no faith, but they will have to have faith in God in order to survive.  After this they continue on.

Exodus 16

“1 The whole Israelite community set out from Elim and came to the Desert of Sin, which is between Elim and Sinai, on the fifteenth day of the second month after they had come out of Egypt. 

2 In the desert the whole community grumbled against Moses and Aaron. 

3 The Israelites said to them, “If only we had died by the Lord’s hand in Egypt! There we sat around pots of meat and ate all the food we wanted, but you have brought us out into this desert to starve this entire assembly to death.”

They do not look forward to the glory to come.  They have been promised a land of their own and that they will become a great nation, but all they can see is the pain of the moment.  They also do not see the past and the many ways that God has come through for them.  Again all they can see is their momentary pain.  We know from Hebrews 12:2 that Jesus endured the cross for the joy set before him, and that is what we need to do as well.  

One thing I notice is that a lot of the locations they went to got their names changed after something big happened there, I wonder how this desert got the name “the desert of sin”.

4 Then the Lord said to Moses, “I will rain down bread from heaven for you. The people are to go out each day and gather enough for that day. In this way I will test them and see whether they will follow my instructions. 

5 On the sixth day they are to prepare what they bring in, and that is to be twice as much as they gather on the other days.”

God’s responses are not just a handout, they are a test.  God does not provide for us just to fill a little need, it is to help us to grow, and to see our response.  After an encounter with God we are not supposed to go back to how things were, but continue growing. 

You have to wonder, if they would just handle one of these situations well, would the rest of the trip have gone easily? They are very impatient, kind of like how Moses was when he was younger, and killed the Egyptian and tried to get things started.  The Israelites just want to be there, but the journey and the growing is very important.  God wants his people to inhabit the lands of Canaan, not just some group of people that doesn’t know him.


Chris Mattison

Links to today’s Bible readingExodus 15-16 and Mark 5

He Watches Over Me

Psalm 121, 123-125, 128-130

Psalm 121 1 2 NIV

Today’s Bible reading is 7 Psalms, each titled  “A song of Ascents”.  They were written to be traveling songs.  I know there isn’t much traveling going on right now, but remember when we would travel to visit family and friends and exciting destinations?   Remember the great fun of planning a trip and hitting the open road – though sometimes there were unplanned surprises around the bend.

Several years ago, right after church the three kids and I were taking the 2 hour jaunt from our hometown in northern Indiana up to my native Grand Rapids, Michigan to enjoy a Sunday dinner with my extended family.  Half-way there, my tire blew and we were stranded on the side of a busy highway.  I did what I could in my dress in the rain, but it quickly became obvious I was going to need some help (and this was back when all my kids were shorter and weaker than I was).  How fortunate for us that an off-duty police officer who was taking his son to the circus saw us in our distress, covered us with his protection, gave of his time and changed our tire for us.  With great relief we thanked him, watched them leave and continued on our way – for a matter of yards.  It didn’t take much for our old spare tire to shred to bits and there we were on the side of the road again, with no spare and our Good Samaritan just out of sight and getting further and further from us.  But with one phone call, my brother left the family dinner table, drove an hour, brought my parent’s spare tire that fit my van, changed the tire and followed us all the way to our destination.

There was no doubt I knew I was very protected and watched over and blessed on that journey, even though it was far from the journey I had planned or expected.  The journey was not without trouble or danger or delay.  It didn’t go according to my time schedule.  But my God was watching over us every step (and tire) of the way.

In today’s psalms the Israelites are traveling up to the temple – to Jerusalem on Mount Zion – to worship the One who never forsakes them.  They don’t have to worry about flat tires, but there would have been many other possible dangers along the way.  In the 8 short verses of Psalm 121 the word “keeps” (also translated “watched over”) is used 6 times.  How comforting to remember the times – over and over again – that God has watched over the Israelites.  And the times that God has – over and over again – watched over me.  And, this protector is not weak.  He is not asleep.  He is not surprised.  He is here.  He is powerful.  He is the Creator of the Universe.  And He cares for you and for me.  We must lift up our eyes to seek Him and acknowledge Him.

You may not be planning a trip today – but you are no doubt on a journey.  A journey of life that includes some unforeseen challenges and flat tires along the way.  Sometimes we will feel weak and stranded. But, Praise God, we are being watched over.  The Maker of Heaven and Earth is keeping us safe.  He is not sleeping on the job.   We can rejoice in rising up to thank the One who protects and guides and cherishes His children, even when our journey has some bumps along the way.

Also, remember God often uses people to do His work.  How will you be a part of God’s rescue of someone who feels weak and stranded and perhaps ready to give up?  How will you provide protection from the dangers on the road?  Maybe you thought you were off-duty and heading to the circus, but God will show you someone who needs your help along the way.  You will arrive just a little later and a little wetter to the circus; but, someone will know you cared – even if you couldn’t provide a permanent fix.  Maybe you will be the brother who leaves the feast to help someone in need get going in the right direction.  God has provided for you.  He has blessed you and supplied you with what you need to be a very valuable part in His rescue of others.  Rejoice in the way He has watched over and provided for you – and let Him use you today.

Marcia Railton

 

Today’s Bible reading can be read or listened to at https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm+121%2C+123-125%2C+128-130&version=NIV

Tomorrow we continue the events of David’s life as we begin 2nd Samuel, chapters 1-4 on our journey through the 2020 Chronological Bible Reading Plan.  It’s a great time and place to jump on and travel with us.  Look up and seek Him!

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